Dennis Aubrey (Photographer, writer)

“I start out attempting to find the physical traces of the immense faith that moved the builders of these churches. But inevitably I am distracted and amazed by the genius of their accomplishments.” Dennis Aubrey

Dennis has been a photographer for more than twenty years. He was founder and CEO of Altamira Group, the software company that created the Genuine Fractals software application, and spent many years developing software for scalable high-resolution digital imagery. His photographic work is characterized by his understanding of the technical accomplishments of the medieval builders and a desire to discover the spiritual underpinning of the structures.

Dennis received a BFA and MFA in directing from Carnegie-Mellon University, where he was named a Distinguished Alumnus. He is a member of the International Association of Architectural Photographers.

Dennis at Abbaye de Bénédictins Saint-Georges, Saint-Martin-de-Boscherville

Dennis at Abbaye de Bénédictins Saint-Georges, Saint-Martin-de-Boscherville

14 responses to “Dennis Aubrey (Photographer, writer)

  1. Hello Aubrey,
    I really appreciated your article on my Aunt Servanne on your Chartres blog.
    When can we connect again to discuss an event to show the photos with the rrench consulate in April or May ?
    I lost your email,

    Damien Balsan
    dbalsan@alum.mit.edu
    617 331 07 55

  2. Thanks so much for commenting on my humble images. In doing so it allowed me to discover your wonderful photographs. You both amaze me in the way you control the light inside those beautiful buildings. I will visit again. Thanks for sharing your work.
    John

  3. Thanks for your comments about my humble images. It has allowed me to discover your excellent photographic project. The quality of your interior views is just brilliant and that’s down to your control and use of the available light. I shall return often.
    Regards
    John

  4. Dennis, I have nominated you for the Beautiful Blogger Award. When I was young, and more of a dreamer, I used to say that I would like nothing better than to hunt down all the oldest churches and do a book on them. Life got in the way and it became a buried dream. I am so happy to have found your blog–for the old churches invoke a response in my soul I cannot describe. I many times feel like God is right there in them. Thank you so much for sharing your gift! They are beautiful…

  5. Dennis,

    This is a wonderful blog for anyone with an interest in medieval art and architecture. One of the best features of this blog lies in the images taken from unusual angles and which give details normally not photographed. My favourite images are those that depict unknown churches rather than the more famous ones. One detail the blog brings out is that, even for those who don’t believe, the buildings depicted here tell a truth that can easily be ignored or overlooked – that religion was central to the lives of our medieval ancestors. Even a non-believer could find these buildings very moving. And secularists should note that religion cannot be written out of European cultural history. These treasures are the product of a religious culture and we should acknowledge this openly and willingly. Well done to everyone for providing such a visual feast!

    • Thanks, Tony. As you must have realized, this project is a passion for both PJ and myself. And we have found that both believers and non-believers alike are moved by these great churches.

  6. Dennis, I just subscribed to your blog, could you tell me, please, whether you have somewhere a map of the sites you have photographed, both in France and in Spain?

  7. My wife found a negative of the Cathedral of Chartres . It’s about 8″ x 6″ . On the negative is the following text : NY197-8/18-German snipersare reported still holding outin the spires of the Cathedralof Chartres in the French town of Chartres which is now in American hands .Battle reports said Germans firing on Americans from towers . FNES …..any idea of it’s origin would be appreciated . The photo is a front shot of the Cathedral with a house to the lower left .

  8. Pingback: Privatization: the Death of Public Life | VIEWS from the EDGE

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